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The Limits of the MarketThe Pendulum Between Government and Market$

Paul De Grauwe

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198784289

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198784289.001.0001

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(p.vii) List of Figures

(p.vii) List of Figures

Source:
The Limits of the Market
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

  1. 1.1. Per capita GDP in dollars (constant prices) 2

  2. 1.2. Global government spending in OECD countries (in % GDP) 4

  3. 1.3. Highest rates of personal income tax 5

  4. 2.1. Real GDP per capita in North and South Korea 12

  5. 3.1. Rising temperatures and CO2 emissions: a non-linear relationship 24

  6. 3.2. Government investments in eurozone countries (in % GDP) 36

  7. 4.1. Bread supply and demand: who receives what? 41

  8. 4.2. Share of total income received by top 10% in Western countries 43

  9. 5.1. Annual growth in production per hour in the US (in %) 58

  10. 5.2. Growth production per capita since the industrial revolution (in %) 60

  11. 5.3. The Kuznets curve 63

  12. 6.1. Trade-off between growth and income equality 70

  13. 6.2. Highest personal income tax rates 71

  14. 6.3. Average annual growth in per capita GDP (in %) 72

  15. 8.1. Spending on social security as % of government spending 84

  16. 8.2. Trade-off between efficiency and equality 87

  17. 8.3. Relationship between efficiency and equality 88

  18. 8.4. Share of total income going to the top 10% 89

  19. 8.5. Average annual growth in per capita GDP (in %) 90

  20. 8.6. Cuts in real-terms growth in expenditure on healthcare (2009–11) 94

  21. (p.viii) 9.1. Market/government hierarchy according to market fundamentalists 98

  22. 9.2. Market/government hierarchy according to government fundamentalists 98

  23. 9.3. Non-hierarchical relationship between government and market 99

  24. 9.4. Gross hourly labour costs in 2013 (euros) 101

  25. 9.5. Hourly labour costs and national competitiveness 103

  26. 9.6. Employer contributions and monthly labour costs (industry and services, excluding public services) in EU (2007) 105

  27. 9.7. Employer contributions and monthly labour costs (2007) 106

  28. 9.8. Hierarchy of economic activity: business view 109

  29. 11.1. Government debt (in % GDP) 119

  30. 11.2. Interest rate on Spanish and UK ten-year government bonds 121

  31. 11.3. Cumulative growth in GDP and budgetary austerity 2009–12 122

  32. 11.4. Increase in government debt/GDP (in %) and budgetary austerity (in % GDP) 2009–12 124

  33. 11.5. Ten-year eurozone government bond spreads 126

  34. 11.6. Monetary base and money supply (M3) in the eurozone (December 2009 = 100) 129

  35. 12.1. National capital in Great Britain and France (in % GDP) 132

  36. 12.2. Public and private capital in Great Britain and France (in % GDP) 133

  37. 12.3. Return (after tax) on capital (r) and growth in GDP (g) in the world 134

  38. 13.1. Index of worldwide industrial production during two recessions 145

  39. 13.2. GDP in constant prices (year 2008 = 100) 146

  40. 13.3. Index of GDP in developed and developing countries 148

  41. 13.4. Inequality and instability 150