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The Origin of MassElementary Particles and Fundamental Symmetries$
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John Iliopoulos

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198805175

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198805175.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
The Origin of Mass
Author(s):

John Iliopoulos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198805175.003.0001

The discovery of a new elementary particle at LHC, the large hadron collider operating at CERN, has stirred great emotion not only in the scientific community, but also in world media. In this little book we argue that this is due to the potential scientific of the discovery: it was the last missing piece in our struggle to understand the structure of the world and it may shed light on the origin of masses in the early Universe. We will explain that this particle is the remnant of a phase transition which occurred when the Universe was only a tiny fraction of a second old. In doing so we will uncover a surprising connection between the laws of physics which we discover in our laboratories while studying the microscopic structure of matter and those which govern the large scale evolution of the world.

Keywords:   CERN, elementary particle, LHC, mass, phase transition

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